The Future of Music Coalition -- a national nonprofit that aims to find creative solutions to challenges involving music and technology -- will gather in New Orleans from Friday, Nov. 3 through Monday, Nov. 6. The meeting hopes to shine a light on continuing post-storm reconstruction efforts in the city's musical community.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting"Since Hurricane Katrina devastated the city just over a year ago, New Orleans has seen an inspiring number of grass roots activist musicians working to rebuild their communities," said FMC Executive Director Jenny Toomey. "This gathering is an opportunity to talk about music and activism in an environment that will support these musicians and draw attention to their ongoing struggle to rebuild."

Participating artists will meet and play a private show with legacy musicians such as Al "Carnival Time" Johnson and local artists including drummer Stanton Moore of Galactic at the legendary Ernie K-Doe Mother-In-Law Lounge. They'll also tour flood-damaged neighborhoods and learn about the reconstruction efforts with the Arabi Wrecking Krewe, a nonprofit volunteer organization of local musicians that helps musical artists and their families return to the city.

On Monday, Nov. 6, participating musicians including country artist Steve Earle, Mike Mills of the pop-rock band R.E.M., singer-songwriter Allison Moorer and Tom Morello of hard rock bands Audioslave and Rage Against the Machine will perform in a concert at Tipitina's that will benefit Arabi Wrecking Krewe; New Orleans Musicians' Clinic, which offers health care for the city's musical community; and Tipitina's Foundation, which has provided financial relief to the city's musicians since Hurricane Katrina.

"New Orleans is still in a time of need right now," says Craig Klein of the funk band Bonerama and the Arabi Wrecking Krewe. "The musicians are very vital and an important cultural part of New Orleans. Without them we lose the New Orleans as we know and love. And with the help of these generous artists, FMC and many others who are concerned about us, we will be back in our homes doing what we want to do -- playing music."