Chris Kromm

Executive Director and Publisher

Chris joined the staff of the Institute in 1997. From 1997 to 2000, he was the editor of Southern Exposure magazine, the Institute's award-winning journal of politics and culture. He was appointed executive director in 2000. He is also publisher of Facing South, the Institute's online magazine.

A frequently-sought commentator on Southern politics and current issues, Chris has appeared on over 300 TV and radio broadcasts including American Public Media's "Marketplace," CNN "Live," C-SPAN, Democracy Now, KCRW California's "To the Point," Mississippi Public Radio, MSNBC's "All In with Chris Hayes," NPR's "All Things Considered," Pacifica Radio, WUNC North Carolina's "The State of Things" and XM Satellite Radio. Kromm's writing has appeared in The Herald-Sun, The Hill, The Huffington Post, The Independent Weekly, The Nation, The News & Observer, Salon and other publications.

Chris is the author or co-author of more than 60 Institute reports on topics ranging from the changing demographic and political landscape in the South to money in politics, labor, voting rights and disaster recovery in the Gulf Coast. Kromm's reports have been covered in more than 350 media outlets, including ABC News, Associated Press, BBC World, Bloomberg News, CNN News, NPR, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Reuters, The Washington Post and USA Today.

Under Chris' leadership, the Institute and its media programs have been recognized with several prestigious honors and awards, including the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting, a North Carolina Justice Center Defenders of Justice Award for Policy Research and Advocacy, a Harry Chapin Media Award for coverage of poverty issues, an Investigative Reporting award from the North Carolina Press Association, and honors from the National Press Club, Society of Professional Journalists, and the White House Correspondents' Association.

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Articles by Chris

Two Years

March 19, 2005 - The latest Facing South newsletter is out, on the two-year anniversary of the ignoble Iraq conflict. Here's this edition's Institute Index: Percent of U.S. soldiers that are from Southern states: 42 Percent of soldiers that are based in the South: 56 Number of U.S. soldiers that have died in Iraq: 1,520 Estimated number of soldiers wounded: 17,000 Percent in U.S. who think number of U.S. casualties has been "unacceptable": 70 Estimated number of civilian deaths in Iraq: 100,000 Cost of Iraq war to U.S. taxpayers, in billions: $157.9

Rogue Nations

March 16, 2005 - Over at Political Animal, substitute blogger Blad Plumer caught some flack yesterday for his hand-wringing about "rogue nations," and the possibility that "they" may get their dangerous hands on the bomb thanks to Bush's attempts to undermine the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Administration Concealed Halliburton Overcharges

March 15, 2005 - A quick update on the latest Halliburton scandal that we reported yesterday.As you may recall, news came out that the Houston-based contractor overcharged the Pentagon $108 million for a single task order in their contract to operate Iraq's oil infrastructure.

Nuclear Country

March 15, 2005 - The New York Times has a fascinating short piece in today's Science section about a largely overlooked and very specialized genre of music: country songs written about the atom bomb after World War II.

Bringing the War Home

March 15, 2005 - Body and Soul has an insightful and disturbing post today about a piece in the Los Angeles Times (reg required), chronicling the phenomena of home-made war movies compiled by soldiers in Iraq and how they're playing back home. From the Times: