Chris Kromm

Executive Director and Publisher

Chris joined the staff of the Institute in 1997. From 1997 to 2000, he was the editor of Southern Exposure magazine, the Institute's award-winning journal of politics and culture. He was appointed executive director in 2000. He is also publisher of Facing South, the Institute's online magazine.

A frequently-sought commentator on Southern politics and current issues, Chris has appeared on over 300 TV and radio broadcasts including American Public Media's "Marketplace," CNN "Live," C-SPAN, Democracy Now, KCRW California's "To the Point," Mississippi Public Radio, MSNBC's "All In with Chris Hayes," NPR's "All Things Considered," Pacifica Radio, WUNC North Carolina's "The State of Things" and XM Satellite Radio. Kromm's writing has appeared in The Herald-Sun, The Hill, The Huffington Post, The Independent Weekly, The Nation, The News & Observer, Salon and other publications.

Chris is the author or co-author of more than 60 Institute reports on topics ranging from the changing demographic and political landscape in the South to money in politics, labor, voting rights and disaster recovery in the Gulf Coast. Kromm's reports have been covered in more than 350 media outlets, including ABC News, Associated Press, BBC World, Bloomberg News, CNN News, NPR, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Reuters, The Washington Post and USA Today.

Under Chris' leadership, the Institute and its media programs have been recognized with several prestigious honors and awards, including the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting, a North Carolina Justice Center Defenders of Justice Award for Policy Research and Advocacy, a Harry Chapin Media Award for coverage of poverty issues, an Investigative Reporting award from the North Carolina Press Association, and honors from the National Press Club, Society of Professional Journalists, and the White House Correspondents' Association.

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Articles by Chris

Nuclear Country

March 15, 2005 - The New York Times has a fascinating short piece in today's Science section about a largely overlooked and very specialized genre of music: country songs written about the atom bomb after World War II.

Bringing the War Home

March 15, 2005 - Body and Soul has an insightful and disturbing post today about a piece in the Los Angeles Times (reg required), chronicling the phenomena of home-made war movies compiled by soldiers in Iraq and how they're playing back home. From the Times:

¡Viva la Blanco!

March 14, 2005 - Last week, Louisiana's moderate governor Kathleen Blanco (D) scored a major coup: leading a bi-partisan delegation in a three-day visit to Cuba, Blanco convinced Cuban officials to purchase $15 million worth of agricultural products from the Bayou state. Blanco's ability to bring home the goods was widely applauded by Louisiana natives, including state Sen. Robert Barham, a farmer and Republican who joined the trade mission.

Stop the War Profiteers

March 14, 2005 - Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) -- whose minority office in the Committee on Government Reform has been a leader in exposing abuse and fraud in Iraq contracts -- issued a letter to the White House today with fellow Rep.

Another Victory for Farmworkers

March 10, 2005 - The Coalition of Immokalee Workers -- a group organizing low-wage workers in southwest Florida -- won a major victory in their battle with Taco Bell and its parent company, Louisville, KY-based Yum! Brands this week, as Reuters reports:Florida farm workers ended a three-year boycott of fast food chain Taco Bell on Tuesday after the company agreed to force its suppliers to pay a penny-per-pound surcharge on Florida tomatoes.

Taxpayers Pay for Wal-Mart's "Low Road"

March 5, 2005 - Of the many ways that Arkansas-based Wal-Mart endangers the public interest, one of the most insidious is how, by paying its workers low wages with almost no benefits, they force tens of thousands of employees to rely on state and federal public assistance programs to make ends meet.