Sue Sturgis

Editorial Director

Sue joined the Institute in November 2005 as director of Gulf Coast Reconstruction Watch, a project to document and investigate the post-Katrina recovery. A former staff writer for The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina, and the Independent Weekly in Durham, North Carolina, Sue directs and writes for the Institute's online magazine, Facing South, with a focus on energy and environmental issues. She was the first journalist to be awarded the North Carolina League of Conservation Voters' Catalyst Award for her commitment to educating the public about important environmental issues.

Sue has authored or co-authored numerous Institute reports, including "Life After BP" (2011), "Faith in the Gulf" (2008), "Hurricane Katrina and the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement" (2008) and "Blueprint for Gulf Renewal" (2007). Her work has also appeared in other publications including The American Prospect, The Progressive, and Salon. Sue holds a master's degree in journalism from New York University and a bachelor's in social work from Penn State.

Email Sue

Articles by Sue

More comments on the Duke lacrosse rape scandal

April 16, 2007 - Anyone who's followed the reaction to the Duke lacrosse rape case in the blogosphere knows that it's occasionally brought out the worst in human nature: racism, misogyny, classism, and a general viciousness, all aided and abetted by people's ability to speak their piece without revealing their identity.

Climate action rallies set for this weekend

April 9, 2007 - This coming Saturday, April 14 marks Step It Up 2007, the first National Day of Climate Action. There will be more than 1,300 gatherings across the country, from big rallies that aims to draw thousands, to modest global-warming awareness events organized by small groups of concerned citizens.

More grim news on global warming

April 6, 2007 - The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change today released its second summary report of the year, this one detailing the observed impacts of global warming on humans and the natural environment. The news is not good.