Join the voice for a changing South.

Sue Sturgis

Editorial Director

Sue joined the Institute in November 2005 as director of Gulf Coast Reconstruction Watch, a project to document and investigate the post-Katrina recovery. A former staff writer for The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina, and the Independent Weekly in Durham, North Carolina, Sue directs and writes for the Institute's online magazine, Facing South, with a focus on energy and environmental issues. She was the first journalist to be awarded the North Carolina League of Conservation Voters' Catalyst Award for her commitment to educating the public about important environmental issues.

Sue has authored or co-authored numerous Institute reports, including "Life After BP" (2011), "Faith in the Gulf" (2008), "Hurricane Katrina and the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement" (2008) and "Blueprint for Gulf Renewal" (2007). Her work has also appeared in other publications including The American Prospect, The Progressive, and Salon. Sue holds a master's degree in journalism from New York University and a bachelor's in social work from Penn State.

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Articles by Sue

Vigil targets N.C. hog waste pollution

June 19, 2007 - Joining together to create what they call the "largest coalition of environmental grass roots organizations ever assembled in North Carolina," two dozen groups working for environmental justice are holding a vigil this week outside the North Carolina legislature to draw attention to the state's hog waste pollution problem and the toll it's taking on people and the environment.

Justice in Durham?

June 19, 2007 - The social disaster that began unfolding more than a year ago in Durham, N.C. after a black woman hired to strip-dance at a Duke University lacrosse team party claimed -- falsely, as it turned out -- she was gang-raped by several white men appears to be moving into the long-term recovery phase.

Gulf Watch: Unfair FEMA

June 16, 2007 - The Federal Emergency Management Agency might have allowed -- even encouraged -- big insurance corporations to rip off taxpayers after Hurricane Katrina. But it certainly won't let John and Jane Q. Storm Victim get any more than they're due.