Defend democracy in the South.

people with disabilities

INSTITUTE INDEX: Ending subminimum wages for workers with disabilities

May 13, 2022 - A number of states, including several in the South, are bucking the federal policy that allows companies to pay workers with certain disabilities less than the basic minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. The Biden administration recently took an initial step to address that pay disparity for tens of thousands of disabled workers nationwide, while a bill to end the practice is stalled in Congress.

VOICES: Why school paddling is legal child abuse

May 4, 2022 - If you've never witnessed or experienced a school paddling, it may be hard to understand how terrifying they are to a child. Yet U.S. public school teachers and principals in 19 states are allowed to beat children with wooden paddles, which originated as a tool to inflict pain on enslaved people without causing permanent injury that might impede their work.

Is justice near for New Orleans teachers wrongly fired after Katrina?

August 27, 2014 - Terminated without due process in the chaos that reigned after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans' unionized public schoolteachers have been fighting back in court -- and winning. After victories in district and appeals courts, they head to the Louisiana Supreme Court next week. Meanwhile, teachers in the charter schools that now control the city's public education system are beginning to unionize.

VOICES: Medicaid misinformation multiplies

January 3, 2013 - One of the biggest decisions facing North Carolina's new legislature and governor is whether to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to cover more than 500,000 low-income people. Much of the opposition to expansion is more about ideology than anything else, a visceral reaction to a law that has been mischaracterized since it was proposed.