Duke Energy

DATAVIZ: Tar Heel Power Broker Profiles

February 10, 2015 - In a new report, "Tar Heel Power Brokers," Facing South/Institute for Southern Studies ranks the top 101 most influential special interests in North Carolina politics through a combination of lobbying power and political spending in N.C. state-level elections. Use this interactive graphic to look up any special interest and learn about its spending and lobbying.

Tar Heel Power Brokers

February 10, 2015 - In a new report, "Tar Heel Power Brokers," Facing South/Institute for Southern Studies ranks the top 101 most influential special interests in North Carolina politics through a combination of lobbying power and political spending in N.C. state-level elections. These four interactive graphics tell the story of these power brokers' influence in state government.

Duke Energy's donations pay off in Florida governor's race

January 7, 2015 - With money from corporations like Duke Energy, the Republican Governors Association funded tens of thousands of ads that helped GOP gubernatorial candidates in 2014. But in Florida, where Duke does business, the RGA instead bankrolled the independent political committee of GOP Gov. Rick Scott, a friend of big energy, to the tune of $9 million.

NC's ongoing coal ash regulatory disaster shows urgency of EPA action

December 11, 2014 - Environmental advocates announced they discovered a coal ash leak into North Carolina's Yadkin River from a Duke Energy power plant just days before 60 Minutes aired a report in which the CEO said her company was "operating safely." Will the EPA finally take tough action to stop the ongoing coal ash disaster in that state and others -- or will that job continue to fall to private watchdogs?

Bigger campaign contributions correlate with more wins for law firms at NC Supreme Court

November 20, 2014 - A study by the Center for American Progress looked at the success rates of law firms arguing cases before North Carolina's highest court and compared them to the firms' contributions to justices' campaigns. The findings underscore concerns about impartiality in a court system flooded in political money since the end of the state's public financing program for judicial races.