environmental justice

WHAT'S NEXT FOR COAL ASH?

May 28, 2010 - Disaster has pushed Washington to call for new standards for handling waste from coal-fired power plants. It's invited citizens to weigh in, but will their voices carry above lobbyists fighting tough regulations? A special Facing South investigation by Sue Sturgis

'DUMPSITES IN DISGUISE'

May 27, 2010 - Coal ash isn't just dumped; it's increasingly being recycled into building materials and other uses. But in states like North Carolina, the failure to adequately regulate one so-called "beneficial use" of the toxic-filled waste is putting communities at risk. A special Facing South investigation by Sue Sturgis

POWER POLITICS

May 26, 2010 - After years of inaction, federal officials are mulling new regulations to confront the growing problem of coal ash. But energy companies have fought off regulation before, and they're fighting the new rules every step of the way. A special Facing South investigation by Sue Sturgis

DISASTER IN EAST TENNESSEE

May 25, 2010 - In December 2008, one of the largest environmental disasters in U.S. history unfolded at the TVA's Kingston coal plant when a massive coal ash holding pond burst. A year and a half later, communities are still feeling the impact -- and there are fears that without federal action a similar disaster could strike elsewhere.

COAL'S DIRTY SECRET

May 24, 2010 - Coal ash is one of the country's biggest waste streams and is full of toxic substances, yet it remains virtually unregulated. Can Washington overcome the fierce opposition of energy interests to protect communities and the environment? A special Facing South investigation by Sue Sturgis

EPA proposes two options for coal ash oversight

May 5, 2010 - The Environmental Protection Agency released not one but two proposals yesterday for regulating coal ash waste from power plants: a stricter rule that would empower the federal government to oversee the material like other hazardous waste, and a less stringent rule that would treat it like ordinary trash and leave oversight up to the states.