Defend democracy in the South.

louisiana

Abortion, slavery, democracy: How the South's ballot measures fared

November 18, 2022 - Voters across the South weighed in on dozens of high-profile ballot initiatives in this year's general election, directly shaping policy on matters including reproductive rights, prison labor, and ballot measures themselves. In another election to be held next month, Louisiana voters will consider three ballot measures, including one to bar noncitizens from voting in local elections.

Louisiana fisherfolk fear Air Products' Lake Maurepas carbon capture scheme

November 14, 2022 - New Orleans-based documentarian Jason Kerzinski recently visited Manchac, Louisiana, to talk to fisherfolk there about an international chemical company's plan to capture carbon dioxide from a nearby natural gas-to-hydrogen plant and pipe it beneath Lake Maurepas. They shared their fears about the $4.5 billion project, which will begin seismic testing on Nov. 17.

As abortion access shrinks in the South, tax dollars flow to fake clinics

October 14, 2022 - A third of U.S. anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers are in the South, a region where dozens of abortion clinics have closed since the Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to an abortion in June. Over the past decade, Republican-controlled legislatures have given millions of tax dollars to these fake clinics that traffic in dangerous misinformation.

VOICES: We can't rely on the courts to determine abortion access

January 19, 2022 - Since a strict anti-abortion law went into effect in Texas in September, many Texans seeking abortion care have gone to Louisiana, even though that state also has severe abortion restrictions and only three clinics offering abortion services. State Reps. Mary González of Texas and Mandie Landry of Louisiana write about the ongoing fight to defend bodily autonomy in states that are especially hostile to women.

INSTITUTE INDEX: Rick Perry's oily plans for an authoritarian America

January 6, 2022 - A text sent to the Trump White House the day after the 2020 election outlining a strategy to have the Supreme Court decide the outcome of the presidential race reportedly came from the phone of former Energy Secretary and Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Championing the election's overthrow didn't dim Perry's job prospects, though: He resigned his Trump administration post that December and the following month became a director for the general partner of Energy Transfer, the Dallas-based pipeline company led by billionaire Trump backer and longtime Perry associate Kelcy Warren, whose interests Perry profitably championed in Washington.