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poverty

The South's economic crisis

October 18, 2011 - In the 1930s, with the country struggling to recover from the Great Depression, President Roosevelt labeled the South "America's Economic Problem Number 1." Today, there are troubling signs that it remains one of the nation's hardest-hit regions.

Latest Census numbers show deepening Southern poverty

September 16, 2011 - The U.S. Census Bureau released its latest poverty figures this week, and they show that poverty is worsening nationwide -- but especially in the South. The official U.S. poverty rate in 2010 was 15.1 percent, up from 14.3 percent in 2009.  That marks the third consecutive annual increase in the national poverty rate, evidence of the persistently weak U.S. economy.

2008 campaign loses a voice for "the other America"

January 30, 2008 - UPDATE: I cross-posted this at DailyKos and it's generating some interesting discussion. It's fitting that former N.C. Senator John Edwards will be heading to New Orleans today to announce his exit from the presidential race. With Edwards' departure, the still-ravaged Gulf Coast will lose its most passionate -- maybe its only -- advocate in the 2008 campaign.

Politics and morality

By R. Neal
June 6, 2006 - The Center for American Progress conducted a poll to find out what Americans think about morality and politics (as opposed to what we are told to believe by our elected representatives in Congress). The findings were interesting:

How Old is the "Old South?"

September 14, 2005 - Last Monday, Condoleeza Rice commented that what happened in the Gulf shows that race and poverty can still come together "in a very ugly way" in parts of the "Old South." But if it's still happening, is it really the "Old South?" Consider this

Multitasking

May 31, 2005 - Check out this post by Andrew Dobbs of Burnt Orange Report on how Texas Republicans treat the poor both as their "punching bag" and as "their personal ATM" (how versatile these poor folks are!):