department of justice

'This is our Selma': Prayers, marches, teach-ins planned as NC voting restrictions go on trial

July 12, 2015 - A federal trial starts this week over a restrictive voting law North Carolina lawmakers passed two years ago after the Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act. People from across North Carolina and beyond will gather outside the courthouse in Winston-Salem to pray, educate and march for voting rights at a moment organizers liken to the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches.

As black churches burn, federal officials seek to calm worried congregations

July 3, 2015 - Following the shooting deaths of nine people at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston by a white supremacist, fires have been reported at seven black churches across the South, with three of the cases ruled arson. With anxiety gripping congregations, federal officials convened a national discussion this week to calm fears and encourage houses of worship to draw up emergency plans.

INSTITUTE INDEX: The fight to restore the Voting Rights Act

March 20, 2015 - Passed after the infamous "Bloody Sunday" attack on civil rights protesters in Alabama in 1965, the Voting Rights Act successfully blocked hundreds of potentially discriminatory election changes -- until the Supreme Court struck down a key provision in 2013. There's an effort underway in Congress to fix the hobbled law, but what are its chances of passing?

The strange death of Lennon Lacy: Another lynching mistaken for suicide?

December 5, 2014 - The August hanging death of a black teen in a small North Carolina town was quickly ruled a suicide, but the conclusion is being challenged by the victim's family and an independent pathologist hired by the N.C. NAACP. The incident is the latest in a disturbing series of hangings of black men that have some wondering whether lynchings have continued into the post-civil rights era.

Bankers gone wild (again)

November 14, 2014 - With North Carolina-based Bank of America and other big banks in trouble again -- this time over pursuing consumer debts that aren't legally collectable and manipulating foreign currency markets -- isn't it time for the Justice Department to stop allowing corporations to evade prosecution?