Sue Sturgis

Editorial Director

Sue joined the Institute in November 2005 as director of Gulf Coast Reconstruction Watch, a project to document and investigate the post-Katrina recovery. A former staff writer for The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina, and the Independent Weekly in Durham, North Carolina, Sue directs and writes for the Institute's online magazine, Facing South, with a focus on energy and environmental issues. She was the first journalist to be awarded the North Carolina League of Conservation Voters' Catalyst Award for her commitment to educating the public about important environmental issues.

Sue has authored or co-authored numerous Institute reports, including "Life After BP" (2011), "Faith in the Gulf" (2008), "Hurricane Katrina and the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement" (2008) and "Blueprint for Gulf Renewal" (2007). Her work has also appeared in other publications including The American Prospect, The Progressive, and Salon. Sue holds a master's degree in journalism from New York University and a bachelor's in social work from Penn State.

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Articles by Sue

Dumping on minorities in North Carolina

October 25, 2006 - North Carolina communities with significant numbers of people of color are more than twice as likely to be located near landfills and other solid waste facilities, according to new research from UNC-Chapel Hill. It was the first study of its kind to be conducted in the state, where controversy has been building recently over the siting of such facilities.

The selling-off of New Orleans' schools

October 20, 2006 - Speaking of Hurricane Katrina's aftermath, a new report looks at the state of New Orleans' public education since last year's disaster -- and raises serious concerns about efforts to privatize the system in the storm's wake.

'Death Row Injustices' exposed in North Carolina

October 18, 2006 - If ever criminal defendants need quality representation, it's when their life is on the line. But at least 37 people currently on North Carolina's death row -- and at least 16 people executed by the state since 1977 -- did not have lawyers at trial who would meet today's minimum standards of qualification for capital defense attorneys.

Greenpeace Urges Testing Following N.C. Chemical Fire

October 10, 2006 - Residents evacuated from a North Carolina town following last week's major fire at a chemical handling facility were allowed to return home Saturday. But an environmental watchdog group warns that the proper testing has not been done to ensure their safety -- and that instructions given by officials could in fact jeopardize the ongoing investigation and any legal action.