racism

UNC student behind 9/11 course controversy connected to Art Pope think tank that aims to slash non-Western classes

September 8, 2015 - An incoming University of North Carolina freshman made headlines for claiming that the school's "Literature of 9/11" course — which he has not taken — sympathizes with terrorists. It turns out the student has connections to a think thank founded and funded by conservative mega-donor Art Pope that has targeted UNC classes emphasizing non-Western and non-white perspectives.

New developments in possible lynching case out of North Carolina

September 1, 2015 - It's been a year since the body of an African-American teen named Lennon Lacy was found hanging from a swing set in Bladenboro, N.C. under circumstances that have led many to question the official suicide ruling. At last week's memorial service for Lacy, state NAACP officials provided updates on the still-open case, offering hope that the truth will be revealed.

VOICES: Confederate/American — two flags, two outcomes

July 22, 2015 - In 1965, South Asian students attended a July 4 rally in Louisiana to see how the holiday was celebrated. But the event was put on by white-supremacist Citizens' Councils, and some in the Confederate flag-waving crowd chased and assaulted the students. Watching Gov. Haley wrestle with the divisiveness over that flag brought back memories for Elaine Parker Adams, who also fled the crowd that day.

As black churches burn, federal officials seek to calm worried congregations

July 3, 2015 - Following the shooting deaths of nine people at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston by a white supremacist, fires have been reported at seven black churches across the South, with three of the cases ruled arson. With anxiety gripping congregations, federal officials convened a national discussion this week to calm fears and encourage houses of worship to draw up emergency plans.

Messages America must hear from Charleston: Rev. Barber's sermon on the Emanuel AME massacre

June 24, 2015 - Rev. Dr. William Barber, president of the NC NAACP and leader of the Moral Monday movement, delivered a sermon Sunday about the messages of the Charleston church shootings: that nine people were killed because their church fought racism, that racism is not just ugly words but policies often promoted through coded racist language, and that we need not closure but systemic change.